Trainspotting murder trial told of ‘possible’ gun link to second shooting

Bradley Welsh shooting scene
Bradley Welsh shooting scene (PA Archive)
16:46pm, Thu 29 Apr 2021
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It is possible the same type of gun fired at a property in Edinburgh was used to kill an actor who appeared in the Trainspotting T2 film, a court has heard.

Bradley Welsh, 48, was fatally shot at his flat in the west end of the city on April 17 2019.

Sean Orman, 30, has pleaded not guilty to all 15 charges against him, including murder, attempted murder, firearms and drugs offences, and is on trial at the High Court in Edinburgh.

Giving evidence on Thursday, ballistics expert Martin Connolly said examinations of discharged ammunition found in a flat and during Mr Welsh’s post-mortem examination showed they were “indistinguishable”.

The court also heard that cartridges found at another property in the city were similar to those fired at Mr Welsh and in the flat.

Richard Goddard QC, advocate depute, said: “When we draw the threads of all that together, one explanation for all these is the same type of gun and ammunition were used to shoot Bradley Welsh and floor in Duddingston Row and that the cartridges at Hawkhill Close were the same type and manufacture of cartridge used to shoot both Bradley Welsh and the floor at Duddingston Row.”

Mr Connolly, 57, added: “Yes, that’s possible.”

The court has previously heard from Dean White, who claimed to have seen Orman fire an “old-style” shotgun into the floor of his brother’s property on Duddingston Row.

Mr Connolly, who works for the Scottish Police Authority, said a double-barrelled sawn-off shotgun recovered by police and shown to the court was manufactured in Belgium between the 1890s and 1960s.

Bradley Welsh shooting forensics (PA Archive)

Meanwhile, Pc David Cuthbert told the court how he had rejected complaints by Orman and his solicitor about the video identification parade process, known as Viper, after his arrest in April 2019.

The court heard images taken for the purposes of the exercise were deemed by Orman to show him with too dark a complexion compared to the others taking part in the line-up.

Pc Cuthbert, 44, said: “The accused went through the process and he made a comment, on memory on his complexion being more tanned than others.”

It was heard the accused’s solicitor attended a later Viper process on May 6 2019 where he also objected to the line-up.

Ian Duguid QC, defence counsel, then read the legal representative’s complaint which included worries about media reports of a tanned suspect.

It said: “There don’t appear to be any stand-ins of sufficiently similar complexion i.e. he quite clearly is tanned.

“There don’t appear to be any other stand-ins that are tanned.

“It’s more significant when there have been reports in the media of a tanned suspect.

“My objection is that for these reasons that the parade as it is constituted is unfair.”

The court was told the officer’s response was that he noted the objection but he deemed the stand-ins were fair in terms of appearances.

A joint minute shows Orman attended Indigo Sun tanning salon in Edinburgh nine times between March 9 2019 and April 12 2019.

The trial, before judge Lord Beckett, continues.

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